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45 MDKK. for projects in health

Friday 12 Jan 18
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Contact

Anja Boisen
Professor
DTU Nanotech
+45 45 25 57 27

Description of the project

MIMIO-Microstructures, microbiota and oral delivery

The human body contains a multitude of benign bacteria which help to keep us healthy. In fact, the number of bacteria cells in the human body far exceeds the number of human cells. A large part of these bacteria lives in our gut and they have a big influence on our health.

An imbalance in the community of bacteria influences the development of a range of diseases such as inflammation. At the moment, it is difficult to restore the microbial composition once it is out of balance and the methods used are inefficient. .

This project will study a new method which in the long run will make it possible to simply ingest a tablet in order to restore the balance of the system. The scientists will load the benign bacteria into micron sized containers and observe whether these when swallowed in tablet-form can deliver bacteria to the right place in the intestine and restore the balance of the gut. The research group will investigate how the micron sized containers can be fabricated and loaded with bacteria and how they behave in cell and animal models.

About the Novo Nordisk Foundation

The Novo Nordisk Foundation is a Danish business owner foundation with a twofold mission:

1) that the companies of the Novo Group create world-class business results.

2) to promote research at universities and hospitals within the health sciences and biotechnology.                  

The Foundation’s vision is: ‘To contribute significantly to research and development that improves the health and welfare of people.’ Read more at www.novonordiskfonden.dk

With grants from the Novo Nordisk Foundation, DTU scientists will gain new knowledge within functions of the brain, nerve damages in the ear and bacteria in the gut.

As part of the Novo Nordisk Foundation’s Interdisciplinary Synergy Programme, a total grant of 45 MDKK supports three DTU scientists’ projects within health technology. The three projects originate from the fact that many health issues today call for solutions that cannot be found within any one traditional research discipline.

The Novo Nordisk Foundation received 89 applications and granted support for the projects of three DTU Professors: Ulrik Lund Andersen, Torsten Dau and Anja Boisen from DTU Nanotech. They will each receive 15 MDKK for their projects about brain functions, nerve damages in the ear and bacteria in the gut.

“With the Synergy Programme, the Novo Nordisk Foundation wishes to advance an innovative interdisciplinary research culture in Denmark by supporting important scientific synergy. The ambition is that the scientific output will be bigger than the output from a single research group,” says Niels-Henrik von Holstein-Rahtlou, Head of Research and Innovation Grants in the Novo Nordisk Foundation.

Benign bacteria in the human body

In her project, Anja Boisen focusses on benign bacteria in the human body. An imbalance in the bacterial community influences the development of a range of diseases such as inflammation in the gut.

“At the moment it is difficult to restore the composition of bacteria (the microbiota) in the gut, if it is out of balance, and the methods used are not very efficient. In our project we will study a new method which in the long run will make it possible to simply ingest a tablet to restore the balance of the system,” says Anja Boisen

Interdisciplinary and International collaboration

In the project, Professor Anja Boisen will collaborate with Professor Trine Rask Licht from DTU Food and Professor Willem Meindert de Vos from the Department of Agrotechnology and Food Sciences, Wageningen University, Netherlands.