HRH The Crown Prince inaugurates new building complex

Friday 03 Nov 17

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The inauguration of DTU’s new building complex—which brings together a large part of the University’s research environment within life sciences and bioengineering—was kicked off by Danish rap performer Per Vers, a light show, musical performances, and speeches at Lyngby Campus on 1 November.

The building complex is a state-of-the-art setting for an international research environment in the cross-field between life sciences and technical sciences.

Foto: Bax Lindhardt

DTU’s new building complex—which brings together a large part of the University’s research in the fields of life sciences and bioengineering—was officially opened on 1 November when HRH Crown Prince Frederik pushed a big red button. The 42,000 m2 building complex comprises both new and renovated buildings and is DTU’s largest construction project since the University relocated to the Lundtofte site in Lyngby in the early 1970s. Photo: Bax Lindhardt.

Photo: Bax Lindhardt

Danish singer Dorthe Gerlach, rap performer Per Vers, and light designer Jesper Kongshaug contributed to the festivities by rapping, singing, and illuminating DTU’s Biosphere—the central room in Building 202. Photo: Bax Lindhardt.

Photo: Bax Lindhardt

The inauguration was attended by President Anders Bjarklev, Per Falholt, Chairman of the Board of Governors, Søren Pind, Minister for Higher Education and Science, Rasmus Larsen, Executive Vice President, Provost, Claus Nielsen, University Director, Executive VIce President, and well as some 600 partners and employees. Photo: Bax Lindhardt.

Photo: Mikal Schlosser
Photo: Mikal Schlosser

Thanks to its most recent new building, DTU can now bring together a large part of the University’s research environment within life sciences and bioengineering building at DTU Lyngby Campus. The new 42,000 m2 building complex is a state-of-the-art setting for an international research environment in the cross-field between life sciences and technical sciences.

The vision for DTU’s initiative within life sciences and bioengineering is to contribute to solving some of the important problems facing society in the 21st century. The focus areas include sustainable food production for an ever-growing population, effective cancer treatment, new healthcare technologies, and the transition from an oil-based to a bio-based chemical and pharmaceutical industry.

Photo: Bax Lindhardt
Photo: Bax Lindhardt

“Thanks to the building complex, we at DTU are in an even better position to provide solutions in the fields of life sciences and bioengineering,” said Anders Bjarklev in his speech.

Photo: Bax Lindhardt
In his speech, Søren Pind, Minister for Higher Education and Science, said:

“There’s a lot of space, lots of light, state-of-the-art test facilities, and teaching rooms—and even rap performers. And it’s very important to have the right research and teaching facilities in the field of life sciences.”

“It’s an area that requires excellent facilities. It is crucial that we look for and find solutions to major life science questions—not just for our own sake, but also for future generations.”

Photo: Bax Lindhardt

After the official inauguration, the Crown Prince and Søren Pind were, among other things, on a guided tour of Building 202. Here, Senior Researcher Jane Behrens told them about the experimental fish pen, which houses cod caught in the eastern Baltic Sea.

Photo: Bax Lindhardt

HRH Crown Prince Frederik and Søren Pind also visited a teaching laboratory with students. The three BEng students on the Food Safety and Quality programme, 3rd semester student Emmelie Joe Freudenberg Rasmussen, 1st semester student Rasmus Oreskov Christoffersen, and 1st semester student Mie Sofie Lynge Loldrup told the visitors how biochemical and DNA-based methods can be used to identify bacteria in our food.

 


About the new complex

The architectural idea behind Building 202

The heart of the newly built part of the building complex (Building 202) is the Biosphere, a three-storey wood-panelled atrium with conference rooms that jut out from the floors and forms a unique and distinctive space with common areas, a canteen, and a café area. The Biosphere will be a place for social meetings and academic exchanges between researchers, students, partners, and guests. The open, bright atrium creates visual contact with researchers and staff on the floors above, and thus supports the vision of openness and knowledge sharing between the various academic fields.


Facts about the 201-205 building complex

 

Client: DTU

Total area: approx. 42,000 m2

Buildings 202+205B, new construction: approx. 29,000 m2

Buildings 201 and 204, renovation: a total of approx. 13,000 m2

Total budget: DKK 1.1 billion

Construction period: 2014–2016

Consultant: Niras

Turnkey consultant: COWI

Sub-consultants: Rørbæk & Møller Arkitekter, Christensen & Co Arkitekter, Norconsult, Schul Landskabsarkitekter, NNE Pharmaplan

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